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1. Sanu, A, Eccles, R. The effects of a hot drink on nasal air flow and symptoms of common cold and flu. Rhinology. 2008; 46(4):271-5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19145994 Accessed September 4, 2015

2. Eccles R., Weber O., Editors. Common Cold. Birkäuser Advances in Infectious Disease Series. Series Editors: Schmidt, A., Weber, O., Kaufmann, S.H.E. Ch: Etiology of the common cold: Modulating Factors by Doyle, W., Cohen, S. p. 159, 2009 Birkäuser Verlag, Basel/Switzerland. http://english.360elib.com/datu/R/EM388443.pdf Accessed September 4, 2015.

3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preventing the flu. Good habits can help stop germs. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/habits.htm Published July 31, 2015. Accessed September 4, 2015.

4. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. What is a cough? National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cough Published date October 1, 2010. Accessed date September 4, 2015.

5. Eccles, R., Menthol: Effects on Nasal Sensation of Airflow and the Drive to Breathe. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep, May 2003; 3(3): 210-4.

6. Eccles, R., Fietze, I. and Rose, U.-B. (2014) Rationale for Treatment of Common Cold and Flu with Multi-Ingredient Combination Products for Multi-Symptom Relief in Adults. Open Journal of Respiratory Diseases, 4, 73-82. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ojrd.2014.43011

7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Key Facts About Influenza (Flu) & Flu Vaccine. http://www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm. Published date 8/7/15. Accessed date 9/24/15.

8. Mayo Clinic. Fever Symptoms. Available at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fever/basics/symptoms/con-20019229 Published May 29, 2014. Accessed September 3, 2015.

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11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work. Symptom Relief. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/community/for-patients/symptom-relief.html Published April 17, 2015. Accessed September 25, 2015.

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20. Mayo Clinic. Dextromethorphan (Oral Route). Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/dextromethorphan-oral-route/description/drg-20068661 Updated September 1, 2010. Accessed September 30, 2015.

21. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Common Colds: Protect Yourself and Others. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/ Updated February 27, 2015. Accessed September 29, 2015.

22. Mayo Clinic. Common Cold. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/common-cold/basics/causes/con-20019062 Published April 17, 2013. Accessed September 29, 2015.

23. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Key Facts About Influenza (Flu) & Flu Vaccine. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm Updated August 7, 2015. Accessed September 29, 2015.

24. American Lung Association. Facts About the Common Cold. Available at: http://www.lung.org/lung-disease/influenza/in-depth-resources/facts-about-the-common-cold.html Accessed September 29, 2015.

25. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US Department of Health & Human Services & National Institutes of Health. Common Cold; Treatment. 2011a. Available at: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/commoncold/pages/treatment.aspx. Accessed January 15, 2012.

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28. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Flu (Influenza) Cause. Available at: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/Flu/understandingFlu/Pages/cause.aspx Updated November 16, 2012. Accessed September 30, 2015.

29. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How Flu Spread. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm Updated September 12, 2013. Accessed September 30, 2015 .

30. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Flu Symptoms & Severity. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/symptoms.htm. Updated August 19, 2015. Accessed September 30, 2015.

31. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Seasonal Influenza: Flu Basics. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/index.htm Updated August 25, 2015. Accessed September 30, 2015.

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34. WebMD. 11 Surprising Sneezing Facts. http://www.webmd.com/allergies/features/11-surprising-sneezing-facts Published January 11, 2010. Accessed September 3, 2015.

35. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. What is cough? Available at: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/Flu/understandingFlu/Pages/cause.aspx. Published October 1, 2010. Accessed September 30, 2015 .

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37. Mayo Clinic. Nasal Congestion. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/nasal-congestion/basics/when-to-see-doctor/sym-20050644 Published March 27, 2013. Accessed October 27, 2015 .

38. National Sleep Foundation. Healthy Sleep Tips. https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-tools-tips/healthy-sleep-tips. Accessed January 14, 2016.

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44. Diphenhydramine. Marketing status as a nighttime sleep-aid drug product for over-the-counter human use; Notice of enforcement policy. Federal Register. 1982. Vol 47, No 79, 23 April 1982, p. 17741. http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/Over-the-CounterOTC-Drugs/StatusofOTCRulemakings/ucm071897.htm.

45. US Code of Federal Regulation. 21 CFR 338-- Nighttime sleep-aid drug products for over-the-counter human use. February 14, 1989.

46. Babe K, Serafin W. Histamine, bradykinin and their antagonists. In: Goodman & Gilman’s Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. 9th ed. Brunton L, ed. Ch 25: 581.

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48. Porter, G. Paranasal Sinus Anatomy and Function, January 2002.

49. Johns Hopkins Medicine. Sinusitis. http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/healthlibrary/conditions/adult/otolaryngology/sinusitis_85,p00464/. Publish date: Unknown. Accessed May 18, 2016.

50. Mayo Clinic. Chronic Sinusitis. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-sinusitis/basics/lifestyle-home-remedies/con-20022039 Published July 2, 2013. Accessed May 19, 2016.

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